Keeping Housing Affordable

Our city’s housing crisis will require a massive effort and coordination to ensure we are adding housing stock to keep our neighborhoods affordable, and are encouraging the community to shape the development.

As councilman, I won’t double down on the failed economic development policies that have favored large corporations and developers over small businesses and property owners so crucial to the economic health of our neighborhoods. I am calling for smart, transit-oriented development to add units to our housing stock, and will coordinate with community organizations to identify vacant lots and city lands along existing thoroughfares that can absorb additional populations and remain connected to our urban centers with multi-modal transportation.

My council office will assist you or your neighbor when they face unlawful eviction and displacement.

 

Wrongful eviction and displacement are increasing in our neighborhoods. As the demand for housing reaches fever pitch, the corporation who place profits over people acts with disregard to tenants facing upheaval and homelessness.

As the council member, my office will always be open and available to assist our community in legal challenges to unlawful evictions and will be working tirelessly to improve and increase housing options locally to mitigate the pressures that lead to McMansion construction, demolishment, and irresponsible development.

Measure S is a choice between a rock and a hard place because of failed leadership in City Hall to serve the people of Los Angeles.  

 

As council member, I will dedicate my office to ending the practices of pay to play spot-zoning and allowing developers to hire their own firm to conduct environmental impact reports (EIR). Mandated plan updates are in the works in Los Angeles and this provision of Measure S is worth implementing on a deliberate timeline. The absence of transparency between City planning and community has contributed to our current housing crisis and the increase of displacement in our neighborhoods.

 I cannot support Measure S as written. Our housing crisis is real, and driving rising costs. We can’t afford for community plans to go through multi-year outreach and review. The economic impact of the proposed General Plan update, height restriction, and zone change moratorium would prevent an estimated 3,000 units from hitting the market per year.

Further, Measure S doesn’t deal directly with the alleged pay-to-play land use decisions it is purportedly correcting. I support the recently introduced anti-corruption ordinance to ban all campaign donations from those seeking a permit approval from the city would directly affect this system of alleged corruption, without the need for a costly two year building moratorium.